Alternatives

✎ Technique: Reflow

Use responsive design to allow your content to zoom and respond to various screen sizes.

Present content without loss of information or functionality, and without requiring scrolling in two dimensions, except for parts of the content which require two-dimensional layout for usage or meaning.

Examples of content which require two-dimensional layout are images, maps, diagrams, video, games, presentations, data tables, and interfaces where it is necessary to keep toolbars in view while manipulating content.

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✎ Technique: Describing graphs

Some people understand complex information best when it's presented visually, such as as a chart or diagram, while others find that reading the information suits them better. For people who use screen readers, a good text equivalent of the information that’s presented graphically is essential for their understanding.

For simple graphics, providing a succinct, informative text alternative is usually fine. But for complex graphics, it's not enough to provide a screen reader user with only short alternative text, such as "...

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✎ Technique: Writing captions

Captions allow people who can't hear a video's soundtrack to have access to a text version of the information provided in the audio.

If you decide to caption your own video content rather than outsource this job to a captioning service, make sure the captions provide an accurate and meaningful alternative to the audio. In particular, when writing captions for audio content in a video, make sure all the spoken content is available in captions, as well as indications of speaker switching (using ">> SPEAKER NAME:") and...

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